ENME

Graduate Course Descriptions

DESIGN AND RELIABILITY OF SYSTEMS

THERMAL, FLUID, AND ENERGY SCIENCES

MECHANICS AND MATERIALS

ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS AND SYSTEMS

RISK AND RELIABILITY ENGINEERING

DESIGN AND RELIABILITY OF SYSTEMS (DRS)

This area of concentration includes the study of design, decision making, and risk management.  In the core courses (ENME 600, 607, and 610), students learn about engineering design methods, engineering decision making, and engineering optimization.  Advanced courses in robotics, optimization, and health care applications are regularly offered, and other electives are occasionally available.  Students are also encouraged to take courses in reliability engineering and systems engineering.

Examples of current research topics include:

  • Conjugated polymer micro-actuators
  • Integration of product development and manufacturing
  • Design formalisms
  • Multi-criteria design decision making
  • Root cause failure
  • Probabilistic risk
  • Common cause failure
  • Structured software
  • Microelectronic devices
  • Information storage
  • Statistical process control
  • Improved manufacturing methods
  • Operator advisory systems
  • Software

The research is supported by dedicated laboratories in:

  • Advanced Design and Manufacturing
  • Computer-Integrated Manufacturing
  • Designer Assistance Tool
  • Decision Support
  • Intelligent Control Engineering
  • Polymer Processing

DRS Course Descriptions

ENME 600 – Engineering Design Methods
(3 credits; offered Fall)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or permission of instructor.

This is an introductory graduate level course in critical thinking about formal methods for design in mechanical engineering.  Course participants gain background in these methods and the creative potential each offers to designers.  Participants will formulate, present, and discuss their own opinions on the value and appropriate use of design materials for mechanical engineering.

ENME 607 – Engineering Decision Making
(3 credits; offered Spring)

Also offered as: ENRE 671. Credit only granted for: ENME 808X, ENRE 671 or ENME 607. Formerly: ENME 808X.

In the course of engineering design, project management, and other functions, engineers have to make decisions, almost always under time and budget constraints. Managing risk requires making decisions in the presence of uncertainty. This course will cover material on individual decision making, group decision making, and organizations of decision-makers. The course will present techniques for making better decisions, for understanding how decisions are related to each other, and for managing risk.

ENME 610 – Engineering Optimization
(3 credits; offered Fall)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. 

Overview of applied single- and multi-objective optimization and decision making concepts and techniques with applications in engineering design and/or manufacturing problems.  Topics include formulation examples, concepts, optimality conditions, unconstrained/constrained methods, and post-optimality sensitivity analysis.  Students are expected to work on a semester-long real-world multi-objective engineering project.

ENME – 625 Multidisciplinary Optimization
(3 credits; offered Spring)
ENME 675 – A Mathematical Introduction to Robotics
(3 credits; offered Fall)

This course is designed to provide graduate students with some of the concepts in robotics from a mathematical viewpoint, including introduction to group theory and basics of SO(3) and SE(3) group applied to robotics, rigid body motion, manipulator kinematics, introduction to holonomic and non-holonomic constraints, and dynamics of robot manipulators.

ENME 725 – Probabilistic Optimization
(3 credits; offered Fall)

Provides an introduction to optimization under uncertainty.  Chance-constrained programming, reliability programming, value of information, two stage problems with recourse, decomposition methods, nonlinear and linear programming theory, and probability theory are covered.  The objectives of this course are to provide understanding for studying problems that involve optimization under uncertainty, learn about various stochastic programming formations (chance constrained programs, two stage methods with recourse, etc.) relevant to engineering and economic settings, present theory for solutions to such problems, and present algorithms to solve these problems.

ENME 741 – Management Science Applications in Engineering
(3 credits; offered Fall)

The fundamentals of management science techniques in project management including linear and integer programming, multi-objective optimization, simulation, Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP), deterministic and stochastic dynamic programming with be covered.  Applications will be drawn from the Critical Path Method (CPM), resource management, and other areas of project management.

ENME 808M – Advanced Topics in Mechanical Engineering: Medical Robotics
(3 credits; offered occasionally)
ENME 808+ – Advanced Topics in Mechanical Engineering: Risk and Reliability in Health Care 
(3 credits; offered Spring)

Also offered as: ENRE 648C.

Quantitative and qualitative reliability and safety analysis methods, including an overview of the healthcare system structure, requirements elicitation, data collection, behavioral modeling, medical errors, system performance indicators, decision support tools, and financial and policy incentives.

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THERMAL, FLUID, AND ENERGY SCIENCES (TFES)

This area of concentration encompasses three broad disciplines: thermal science, fluid mechanics, and energy science. Areas of specialization include heat transfer, combustion, energy systems analysis, hydrodynamics, turbulence, and computational fluid dynamics.

Examples of current research topics include:

  • Application of three-dimensional vortex methods to turbulent flow prediction
  • Experimental, numerical, and theoretical analysis of scalar pollutant dispersion in turbulent boundary layers
  • Experimental studies of the near surface atmospheric boundary layer
  • Large-eddy and direct numerical simulation of 3-D and non-equilibrium boundary layers
  • Experimental measurement and analysis of particle/turbulence interaction within turbulent, multi-phase flows
  • Fundamental research into pool and flow boiling heat transfer
  • Experimental investigation of steady and unsteady breaking waves
  • Fouling and particulate deposition on low temperature surfaces
  • Performance of water foaming agents in fire protection applications
  • Mixing of boron diluted water slugs and nuclear reactor reactivity excursions
  • Thermal management and characterization of electronic equipment
  • Transport phenomena in manufacturing
  • Study of absorption heat pumps and chillers
  • Heat transfer enhancement of environmentally safe refrigerants
  • Investigation of performance potential for natural refrigerant
  • Simulation, analysis, and experimentation in heat pump and refrigeration systems
  • Annular and post-annular flow in microchannels
  • Two-phase thermofluid enhancement through flow regime modification
  • Monolithic and thin-film thermoelectric microcoolers

TFES Course Descriptions

ENME 631 – Advanced Conduction and Radiation Heat Transfer
(3 credits; offered Fall)

Prerequisite: ENME 332; or students who have taken courses with similar or comparable course contact may contact the department; or permission of instructor.

Theory of conduction and radiation. Diffused and directional poly- and mono-chromatic sources. Quantitative optics. Radiation in enclosures. Participating media. Integro-differential equations. Multi-dimensional, transient and steady state conduction. Phase change. Coordinate system transformations.

ENME 632 – Advanced Convection Heat Transfer
(3 credits; offered Spring)

Also offered as: ENNU 615. Credit only granted for: ENNU 615 or ENME 632.

Statement of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. Laminar and turbulent heat transfer in ducts, separated flows, and natural convection. Heat and mass transfer in laminar boundary layers. Nucleate boiling, film boiling, Leidenfrost transition, and critical heat flux. Interfacial phase change processes; evaporation, condensation, and industrial applications such as cooling towers and condensers. Heat exchanger design.

ENME 633 – Molecular Thermodynamics
(3 credits; offered occasionally)

Restriction: Permission of the department.

This course will focus on the interactions between molecules, which govern thermodynamics relevant to engineering. It will develop an appreciation for both classical and statistical approaches to thermodynamics for understanding topics such as phase change, wetting of surfaces, chemical reactions, adsorption, and electrochemical processes. The course will also investigate statistical approaches and molecular simulation tools to understand how microscopic analysis can be translated to macroscopic problems.

ENME 635 – Energy Systems Analysis
(3 credits; offered Spring)

Rankine cycles with nonazeotropic working fluid mixtures, two-, multi-, and variable-stage absorption cycles and vapor compression cycles with solution circuits. Power generation cycles with working fluid mixtures. Development of rules for finding all possible cycles suiting a given application or the selection of the best alternative.

ENME 640 – Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics
(3 credits; offered Fall)

Prerequisite: Must have completed partial differential equations at the level of MATH 462; or permission of department.

Equations governing the conservation of mass, momentum, vorticity and energy in fluid flows are illustrated by analyzing a number of simple flows. Emphasis on physical understanding facilitating the study of advanced topics in fluid mechanics.

ENME 641 – Viscous Flow
(3 credits; offered occasionally)

Fluid flows where viscous effects play a significant role. Examples of steady and unsteady flows with exact solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations. Boundary layer theory. Stability of laminar flows and their transition to turbulence.

ENME 642 – Hydrodynamics
(3 credits; offered occasionally)

Prerequisite: ENME 640; or students who have taken courses with similar or comparable course content may contact the department; or permission of instructor.

Formerly ENME 653. Exposition of classical and current methods used in analysis of inviscid, incompressible flows.

ENME 646 – Computational Fluid Dynamics and Heat Transfer
(3 credits; offered Spring)

Numerical solution of inviscid and viscous flow problems. Solutions of potential flow problems, Euler equations, boundary layer equations and Navier-Stokes equations. Applications to turbulent flows.

ENME 647 – Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer
(3 credits; offered occasionally)

Boiling and condensation in stationary systems, phase change heat transfer phenomenology, analysis and correlations. Fundamentals of two-phase flow natural circulation in thermal hydraulic multi-loop systems with applications in nuclear reactor safety. Multiphase flow fundamentals. Critical flow rates. Convective boiling and condensation. Multiphase flow and heat transfer applications in power and process industries.

ENME 656 – Physics of Turbulent Flow
(3 credits; offered occasionally)

Definition of turbulence and its physical manifestations. Statistical methods and the transport equations of turbulence quantities. Laboratory measurement and computer simulation methods. Isotropic turbulence. Physics of turbulent shear flows.

ENME 701 – Sustainable Energy Conversion and the Environment
(3 credits; offered Fall)

Recommended: ENME 633.

Credit only granted for: ENME701, ENME706 or ENME808D. Formerly: ENME 706 and ENME 808D.

Discussion of the major sources and end-uses of energy in our society with particular emphasis on renewable energy production and utilization. Introduces a range innovative technologies and discusses them in the context of the current energy infrastructure. Renewable sources such as wind and solar are discussed in detail. Particular attention is paid to the environmental impact of the various forms of energy.

ENME 707 – Combustion and Reacting Flow
(3 credits; offered occasionally)

Prerequisite: ENME331 and ENME332; or students who have taken courses with similar or comparable course content may contact the department.

This course covers thermochemistry and chemical kinetics of reacting flows in depth. In particular, we focus on the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels in both a phenomenological and mechanistic approach. The course covers the specifics of premixed and nonpremixed flame systems, as well as ignition and extinction. Combustion modeling with equilibrium and chemical kinetics methods will be addressed. Environmental impact and emissions minimization will be covered in detail. Finally, the course will cover available combustion diagnostic methods and their applications in laboratory and real-world systems.

ENME 712 – Measurements in Thermo-Fluid Processes
(3 credits; offered occasionally)

This course is designed to offer systematic coverage of the methodologies for measurement and data analysis of thermal and fluid processes at the graduate level. The course materials will cover three broad categories: (1) Fundamentals of thermal and fluid processes in single phase and multi-phase flows as related to this course; (2) measurement/instrumentation techniques for measurement of basis quantities such as pressure, temperature, flow rate, heat flux, etc.; and (3) experimental design and planning, sources of errors in measurements, and uncertainty analysis.

ENME 725 – Probabilistic Optimization
(3 credits; offered Fall)

Provides an introduction to optimization under uncertainty.  Chance-constrained programming, reliability programming, value of information, two stage problems with recourse, decomposition methods, nonlinear and linear programming theory, and probability theory are covered.  The objectives of this course are to provide understanding for studying problems that involve optimization under uncertainty, learn about various stochastic programming formations (chance constrained programs, two stage methods with recourse, etc.) relevant to engineering and economic settings, present theory for solutions to such problems, and present algorithms to solve these problems.

ENME 741 – Management Science Applications in Engineering
(3 credits; offered Fall)

The fundamentals of management science techniques in project management including linear and integer programming, multi-objective optimization, simulation, Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP), deterministic and stochastic dynamic programming with be covered.  Applications will be drawn from the Critical Path Method (CPM), resource management, and other areas of project management.

Optimization Spreadsheet
ENME 808L – Advanced Topics in Mechanical Engineering: Ultra-Low Energy Use Appliance Design II
(3 credits; offered occasionally)

ENME 808P – Advanced Topics in Mechanical Engineering: Ultra-Low Energy Use Appliance Design I
(3 credits; offered occasionally)
ENME 808W – Advanced Topics in Mechanical Engineering: Advanced Energy Audits
(3 credits; offered Fall)

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MECHANICS AND MATERIALS (MM)

This division concentrates on studies of analytical and experimental fundamentals of mechanics and materials. Areas of specialization include: Computational modeling; control systems, design, characterization, and manufacturing of materials; elasticity; experimental mechanics; micro-nano-bio systems; noise and vibration control; nonlinear dynamics; robotics and intelligent machines; smart structures.

Examples of current research topics include:

  • Control systems in product development organization
  • Dynamic deformation and fracture studies, including fracture and fragmentation by explosives
  • Fiber optics
  • Smart structures
  • Vibration and acoustic control
  • Non-linear dynamics of milling of thin walled structures
  • Control of crane-load oscillations
  • Development of creep-fatigue damage models for viscoplastic materials such as solder
  • Micromechanics of advanced composite materials
  • Characterization and optimization of mechanical properties of materials
  • Processing and composition for allow property testing methods for non-destructive detection of damage in structural systems
  • Mechanical characterization of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) materials
  • Modal testing methods for non-destructive detection of damage in structural systems
  • Manufacturing systems
  • Design and manufacturing of functionally graded materials for smart structures and microdevices

MM Course Descriptions

ENME 605 – Advanced Systems Control
(3 credits; offered Fall & Spring)

Prerequisite: ENME462; or permission of instructor.

Modern control theory for both continuous and discrete systems. State space representation is reviewed and the concepts of controllability and observability are discussed. Design methods of deterministic observers are presented and optimal control theory is formulated. Control techniques for modifying system characteristics are discussed.

ENME 611 – Fiber Optics
(3 credits; offered occasionally)

Introduces students to fiber optics, provides a background including fiber optic components and terminology, and equip students with ability to understand and evaluate various kinds of fiber optic sensors for a wide range of applications along with a detailed understanding of relevant signal processing and analysis techniques.

ENME 662 – Linear Vibrations
(3 credits; offered Fall)

Development of equations governing small oscillations of discrete and spatially continuous systems. Newton’s equations, Hamilton’s principle, and Lagrange’s equations. Free and forced vibrations of mechanical systems. Modal analysis. Finite element discretization and reductions of continuous systems. Numerical methods. Random vibrations.

ENME 664 – Dynamics
(3 credits; offered Spring)

Prerequisite: ENES 221; or students who have taken courses with similar or comparable course content may contact the department; or permission of instructor. Kinematics in plane and space; dynamics of particles, system of particles, and rigid bodies. Holonomic and non-holonomic constraints. Newton’s equations, D’Alembert’s principle, Hamilton’s principle, and Lagrange’s equations. Impact and collisions. Stability of equilibria.

ENME 665 – Advanced Vibrations
(3 credits; offered occasionally)

Nonlinear oscillations and dynamics of mechanical and structural systems. Classical methods, geometrical, computational, and analytical methods. Bifurcations of equilibrium and periodic solutions; chaos.

ENME 670 – Continuum Mechanics
(3 credits; offered Fall)

Mechanics of deformable bodies, finite deformation and strain measures, kinematics of continua and global and local balance laws. Thermodynamics of continua, first and second laws. Introduction to constitutive theory for elastic solids, viscous fluids and memory dependent materials. Examples of exact solutions for linear and hyper elastic solids and Stokesian fluids.

ENME 671 – Deformable Bodies
(3 credits; offered ----)

ENME 672 – Composite Materials
(3 credits; offered Spring)

Micromechanics of advanced composites with passive and active reinforcements, mathematical models and engineering implications, effective properties, damage mechanics, and recent advances in “adaptive” or “smart” composites.

ENME 674 – Finite Element Methods
(3 credits; offered Spring)

Theory and application of finite element methods for mechanical engineering problems such as stress analysis, thermal and fluid flow analysis, electromagnetic field analysis and coupled boundary-value problems for “smart” or “adaptive” structure applications, and stochastic finite element methods.

ENME 675 – A Mathematical Introduction to Robotics
(3 credits; offered Fall)

Credit only granted for: ENME 675 or ENME 808V. Formerly: ENME 808V.

Designed to provide graduate students with an understanding of concepts in robotics from a mathematical viewpoint; topics include introduction to group theory, rigid body motion, manipulator kinematics, introduction to holonomic and nonholonomic constraints, and dynamics of robot manipulators.

ENME 676 – Advanced Mechanics of Materials
(3 credits; offered Spring)

Credit only granted for: ENME 676, ENME 808Z, or ENME 489Z. Formerly: ENME 808Z, but not since 2008; ENME808Z was subsequently used to designate another course (now ENME 715).

Use of basic principles of mechanics to design more robust mechanical structures and systems. Simple techniques are presented to analyze deformation/strains as well as forces/stresses in linear elastic structures under mechanical loading. A simple overview of the finite element method is also presented.

ENME 680 – Experimental Mechanics
(3 credits; offered occasionally)

Advanced methods of measurement in solid and fluid mechanics. Topics covered include scientific photography, moire, photelasticity, strain ga[u]ges, interferometry, holography, speckle, NDT techniques, shock and vibration, and laser anemometry.

ENME 684 – Modeling Material Behavior
(3 credits; offered occasionally)

Prerequisite: ENME670; or permission of instructor.

Constitutive equations for the response of solids to loads, heat, etc., based on the balance laws, frame invariance, and the application of thermodynamics to solids. Non-linear elasticity with heat conduction and dissipation. Linear and non-linear non-isothermal viscoelasticity with the elastic-viscoelastic correspondence principle. Classical plasticity and current viscoplasticity using internal state variables. Maxwell equal areas rule, phase change, and metastability and stability of equilibrium states. Boundary value problems. Introduction to current research areas.

ENME 704 – Active Vibration Control
(3 credits; offered occasionally)

This course aims at introducing the basic principles of the finite element method and applying it to plain beams treated with piezoelectric actuators and sensors. The basic concepts of structural parameter identification are presented with emphasis on Eigensystem Realization Algorithm (ERA) and auto-regression models (AR). Different active control algorithms are then applied to beams/ piezo-actuator systems. Among these algorithms are: direct velocity feedback, impdance matching control, modal control methods and sliding mode controllers. Particular focus is given to feed forward Lea[s]t Mean Square (LMS) algorithms and filtered-X LMS. Optimal placement strategies of sensors and actuators are then introduced and applied to beam/piezo-actuator systems.

ENME 711 – Vibration Damping
(3 credits; offered occasionally)

This course aims at introducing the different damping models that describe the behavior of viscoelastic materials. Emphasis will be placed on modeling the dynamics of simple structures (beams, plates and shells) with Passive Constrained Layer Damping (PCLD). Considerations will also be given to other types of surface treatments such as Magnetic Constrained Layer Damping (MCLD), Shunted Network Constrained Layer Damping (SNCLD), Active Constrained Layer Damping (ACLD) and Electrorheological Constrained Layer Damping (ECLD). Energy dissipation characteristics of the damping treatments will be presented analytically and by using the modal strain energy approach as applied to finite element models of vibrating structure.

ENME 713 – Nanoparticle Aerosol Dynamics
(3 credits; offered occasionally)

Covers the basic science of nanoparticle formation, growth, and transport; the science and engineering of measurement; and the environmental impact and industrial use of nanoparticles.

ENME 740 – Advanced Topics in Mechanical Engineering: Lab-on-a-Chip Microsystems
(3 credits; offered occasionally)

Fundamentals and application of lab-on-a-chip and microfluidic technologies. A broad view of the field of microfluidics, knowledge of relevant fabrication methods and analysis techniques, and an understanding of the coupled multi-domain phenomena that dominate the physics in these systems.

ENME 808G – Advanced Topics in Mechanical Engineering: Flexible Macroelectronics
(3 credits; offered occasionally)
ENME 808N – Advanced Topics in Mechanical Engineering: Nanomechanics I
(3 credits; offered occasionally)
ENME 808T – Advanced Topics in Mechanical Engineering: Dynamics and Control of Robotic Systems
(3 credits; offered Fall)

Prior experience in ENME 664 and ENME 605 will be useful; however, it is not required.

Review of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian derivation of the robot dynamics, derivation of fundamental properties of robot dynamics. Control techniques for tracking and disturbance rejection such as PD, PID, computed torque, nonlinear adaptive and robust control. Geometric techniques for control of nonholonomic robotic systems will be introduced. Force control/impedance control will be studied for contact control. Basic estimation techniques in robotics such as Kalman Filtering/Particle Filtering will also be discussed. Semester projects in areas such as control of human-robot interaction.

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ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS AND SYSTEMS (EPS)

This area of concentration addresses the fundamental methods to attain more cost-effective and reliable electronic packaging. Areas of specialization include: Electronic packaging; materials characterization; accelerated testing; condition monitoring; computer aided life cycle engineering (CALCE).

Examples of current research topics include:

  • Development of physics-of-failure of electronic equipment
  • Experimental validation of electronic packaging designs
  • New material combinations
  • Incorporating reliability, producibility, supportability, and life-cycle parameters into integrated product design and manufacturing
  • Plastic encapsulated microcircuits
  • Thermal management
  • Connectors and contacts
  • Electro-optics
  • High temperature electronics

The research is supported by the following dedicated laboratories:

  • Electromagnetic Propagation and Compatibility
  • Electronic Systems Cost Modeling
  • Failure Analysis and Materials Characterization
  • Permanent Interconnects and Acceleration Testing

In addition, research is supported in the following centers:

EPS Course Descriptions

ENME 690 – Mechanical Fundamentals of Electronic Systems
(3 credits; offered Fall)

This course will provide the student with an understanding of the fundamental mechanical principles used in the design of electronic devices and their integration into electronic systems. It will focus on the effect of materials compatibility, thermal stress, mechanical stress, and environmental exposure on product performance, durability, and cost. Both electronic devices and package assemblies will be considered. Analysis of package assemblies to understand thermal and mechanical stress effects will be emphasized through student projects.

ENME 693 – High-Density Electronic Assemblies and Interconnects
(3 credits; offered occasionally)

This course presents the mechanical fundamentals needed to address reliability issues in high-density electronic assemblies. Potential failure sites and the potential failure mechanisms are discussed for electronic interconnects at all packaging levels from the die to electronic boxes, with special emphasis on thermo-mechanical durability issues in surface mount interconnects. Models are presented to relate interconnect degradation and aging to loss of electrical performance. Design methods to prevent failures with in the life cycle are developed.

ENME 695 – Design for Reliability
(3 credits; offered Spring)

This course will present classical reliability concepts and definitions based on statistical analysis of observed failure distributions. Techniques to improve reliability, based on the study of root-cause failure mechanisms, will be presented, based on knowledge of the life-cycle load profile, product architecture, and material properties. Techniques to prevent operational failures through robust design and manufacturing processes will be discussed. Students will gain the fundamentals and skills in the field of reliability as it directly pertains to the design and the manufacture of electrical, mechanical, and electromechanical products.

ENME 715 – Design in Electronic Product Development
(3 credits; offered occasionally)

Introduces students to the design methodologies and design tools used to create electronic systems; merges technology, analysis, and design concepts into a methodology for designing an electronic product.

ENME 737 – Prognostics and Health Management
(3 credits; offered Fall)

Prognostics and health management (PHM) is an enabling discipline consisting of technologies and methods to assess the reliability of a product in its actual life cycle conditions to determine the advent of failure and mitigate system risk. PHM permits the reliability of a system to be evaluated and predicted in its actual application conditions. In recent years, prognostics and health management (PHM) has emerged as a key enabling technology to provide an early warning of failure; to forecast maintenance as needed; to reduce maintenance cycles; to assess the potential for life extensions; and to improve future designs and qualification methods. In future, PHM will enable systems to assess their own real-time performance (self-cognizant health management and diagnostics) under actual usage conditions and adaptively enhance life cycle sustainment with risk-mitigation actions that will virtually eliminate unplanned failures.

ENME 765 – Thermal Issues in Electronic Systems
(3 credits; offered occasionally)

Prerequisite: ENME331 and ENME332; or students who have taken courses with similar or comparable course content may contact the department. This course addresses a range of thermal issues associated with electronic products life cycle.

Topics include: Passive, active, and hybrid thermal management techniques for electronic devices and systems. Computational modeling approaches for various levels of system hierarchy. Advanced thermal management concepts, including single phase and phase change liquid immersion, heat pipes, and thermoelectronics.

ENME 770 – Life Cycle Cost and System Sustainment Analysis
(3 credits; offered occasionally)

This course melds elements of traditional engineering economics with manufacturing process modeling and life cycle cost management concepts to form a practical foundation for predicting the cost of commercial products. Methodologies for calculating the cost of systems will be presented. Product life cycle costs associated with scheduling design, reliability, design for environment (life cycle assessment), and end-of-life scenarios will be discussed. In addition, various manufacturing cost analysis methods will be presented, including process-flow, parametric, cost of ownership, and activity based costing. The effects of learning curves, data uncertainty, test and rework processes, and defects will be considered. This course will use real life design scenarios from integrated circuit fabrication, electronic systems assembly, and substrate fabrication as examples of the applications of the methods mentioned above.

ENME 780 – Mechanical Design of High Temperature and High Power Electronics
(3 credits; offered occasionally)

This course will discuss issues related to silicon power device selection (IGBT, MCT, GTO, etc.), the characteristics of silicon device operation at temperatures greater than 125C, and the advantages of devices based in SOI and SIC. It will also discuss passive component and packaging materials selection for distributing and controlling power, focusing on the critical limitations to the use of many passive components and packaging materials at elevated temperatures. In addition it will cover packaging techniques and analysis to minimize the temperature elevation caused by power dissipation. Finally, models for failure mechanisms in high temperature and high power electronics will be presented together with a discussion of design options to mitigate their occurrence.

ENME808F – Advanced Topics in Mechanical Engineering: Sensor/Actuators
(3 credits; offered occasionally)

Advances in electronics can be measured by the benefits real products provide to customers. Many of the key benefits depend upon the ability of electronics to interface with the environment using electronic sensors. Examples of everyday electronic systems using sensors range from the mundane grocery store door opener to Doppler radar based systems to complex weather satellites. For example, electronic sensors are now common in automobile anti-lock braking, airbag deployment, police radar, ignition control, and emissions control systems. This course will provide a detailed overview of electronic sensor operation, selection, component packaging and mechanical and architectural integration into practical electronics systems. New advances in the MEMS or optical based sensor technologies need to pass the hurdle of economic and reliable packaging before their realization as viable products. These current challenges and future development potential in sensors will offer opportunities for engineers to work in innovative and exciting new applications.

ENME 799 – Master’s Thesis Research (1 - 6 credits)
ENME 898 Pre-Candidacy Research (1 - 8 credits)

ENME 899 (Perm Req) Doctoral Dissertation Research (6 credits)

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RELIABILITY AND RISK ENGINEERING

This program covers aspects of engineering related to reliability and risk assessment. The primary areas of specialization include: Microelectronic reliability; reliability analysis; risk analysis; and software reliability.

Examples of current research topics include:

  • Measuring, tracking, and predicting levels of reliability during systems life cycle
  • Understanding why and how components, systems, and processes fail
  • Improvement of reliability by removing failure causes
  • Providing input to decision making on system design and operation
  • Determining potential undesirable consequences of systems and processes
  • Identifying how potential undesirable consequences of systems and processes happen
  • Assessing the probability of frequency of consequences
  • Providing input to decision makers on optimal strategies to reduce risk
  • Human reliability analysis
  • Microelectronic device reliability and stress analysis
  • Software quality assurance
  • Study of information security and software safety
  • Software testing

Reliabilty Course Descriptions

ENRE 447 – Fundamentals of Reliability Engineering
(3 credits; also offered as ENMA 426; offered ----)

Credit only granted for ENRE 445 or ENRE 447. Formerly ENRE 447.

The main objective of the course is to understand the basic degradation mechanisms of materials, devices and components through the understanding of the physics, chemistry, mechanics of such mechanisms. Mechanical failures are introduced through understanding fatigue, creep and yielding in materials, and devices. Physical or chemical related failures are introduced through a basic understanding of physical mechanisms such as diffusion, electromigration, defects and defect migration, surface trapping mechanisms, charge creation and migration. Failure mechanisms observed in engineering materials will also be presented as well as failure mechanisms in semiconductor devices.

ENRE 489 – Special Topics in Reliability Engineering
(3 credits; offered Spring)

ENRE 600 – Fundamentals of Failure Mechanisms
(3 credits; offered Fall)

Required core course.

Credit only granted for ENMA 698M, ENNU 648M, or ENRE 600.

Physical, chemical, and thermal related failures are introduced through a basic understanding of degradation mechanisms such as diffusion, electromigration, defects and defect migration. The failure mechanisms in basic material types will be taught. Failure mechanisms observed in real devices will also be presented. Problems related to manufacturing, and achieving quality and reliability will be analyzed. Mechanical failures are emphasized from the point of view of complex fatigue theory. The mathematical and statistical basis for analysis is presented as well as Failure Mode and Failure Analysis.

ENRE 602 – Reliability Analysis
(3 credits; offered Fall)

Required core course.

Principal methods of reliability analysis, including fault tree and reliability block diagrams; failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA; event tree construction and evaluation; reliability data collection and analysis; methods of modeling systems for reliability analysis. Focus on problems related to process industries, fossil-fueled power plant availability, and other systems of concern to engineers.

ENRE 620 – Mathematical Techniques of Reliability Engineering
(3 credits; offered Summer)

Basic probability and statistics (required for ENRE 600 and ENRE 602). Application of selected mathematical techniques to the analysis and solution of reliability engineering problems. Applications of matrices, vectors, differential equations, integral transforms, and probability methods to a wide range of reliability-related problems.

ENRE 640 – Collection and Analysis of Reliability Data
(3 credits; offered occasionally)

Basic life model concepts. Probabilistic life models, for components with both time independent and time dependent loads. Data analysis, parametric and nonparametric estimation of basic time-to-failure distributions. Data analysis for systems. Accelerated life models. Reparable systems modeling.

ENRE 641 – Probabilistic Physics of Failure and Accelerated Testing
(3 credits; offered Spring)

Models for life testing at constant stress. Graphical and analytical analysis methods. Test plans for accelerated testing. Competing failure modes and size effects. Models and data analyses for step and time varying stresses. Optimization of test plans.

ENRE 642 – Reliability Engineering Management
(3 credits; offered Summer)

Unifying systems perspective of reliability engineering management. Design, development and management of organizations and reliability programs including: Management of systems evaluations and test protocols; development of risk management-mitigation processes; and management of functional tasks performed by reliability engineers.

ENRE 645 – Human Reliability Analysis
(3 credits; offered occasionally)

Prerequisite: ENRE 600 and ENRE 602; or permission of ENME department. Credit only granted for ENRE 645 or ENRE 734. Formerly ENRE 734.

Methods of solving practical human reliability problems, the THERP, SLIM, OAT, and SHARP methods, performance shaping factors, human machine systems analysis, distribution of human performance and uncertainty bounds, skill levels, source of human error probability data, examples and case studies.

ENRE 648 – Special Problems in Reliability Engineering
(1-6 credits)

Repeatable up to 6 credits if content differs. For students who have definite plans for individual study of faculty-approved problems. Credit given according to extent of work.

ENRE 648B – Special Problems in Reliability Engineering: Life Cycle Cost and System Sustainment Analysis
(3 credits; offered occasionally)

ENRE 648C – Special Problems in Reliability Engineering: Risk and Reliability in Health Care
(3 credits; offered occasionally)

ENRE 655 – Advanced Methods in Reliability Engineering
(3 credits; offered Spring)

Prerequisite: ENRE 602. Credit only granted for ENRE 655 or ENRE 665. Formerly ENRE 665.

Bayesian methods and applications, estimation of rare event frequencies, uncertainty analysis and propagation methods, reliability analysis of dynamic systems, analysis of dependent failures, reliability of reparable systems, human reliability analysis methods, and theory of logic diagrams and application to systems reliability.

ENRE 670 – Probabilistic Risk Assessment
(3 credits; offered Fall)

Prerequisite: ENRE 602. Also offered as ENNU 651. Credit will only be given for ENRE 670 or ENNU 651.

Why study risk, sources of risk, overview of Risk Assessment and Risk Management, relation to System Safety and Reliability Engineering; measures, representation, communication, and perception of risk; overview of use of risk assessment results in decision making; overview of Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) process; detailed converge of PRA methods including (1) methods for risk scenario development such as identification of initiators, event sequence diagrams, event trees, causal modeling (fault trees, influence diagrams, and hybrid methods), and simulation approaches; (2) methods of risk scenario likelihood assessment, including quantitative and qualitative approaches, as well as uncertainty modeling and analysis. Also covers methods for risk modeling of system hardware behavior, physical phenomena, human behavior, software behavior, organizational environment, and external physical environment. Additional core topics include risk model integration and quantification (Boolean-based, binary decsion diagram, Bayesian belief networks, and hybrid methods), simulation-based Dynamic PRA methods (discrete and continuous) and several examples of large scale PRAs for space missions, nuclear power, aviation and medical systems.

ENRE 671 – Risk Management in Engineering
(3 credits; offered Spring)

Prerequisite: ENRE 670. Credit only granted for: ENRE 648W or ENRE 671. Formerly: ENRE648W.

Introduction to risk management and decision-making, including uncertainty propagation, importance ranking, risk acceptance criteria, decision analysis and other decsion-making techniques, risk communication. ENRE 682 – Software Reliability and Integrity (3 credits; offered occasionally)

ENRE 684 – Information Security
(3 credits; offered Spring)

Credit only granted for: ENRE 648J or ENRE 684. Formerly: ENRE 648J.

This course is divided into three major components: overview, detailed concepts and implementation techniques. The topics to be covered are: general security concerns and concepts from both a technical and management point of view, principles of security, architectures, access control and multi-level security, trojan horses, covert channels, trap doors, hardware security mechanism, security models, security kernels, formal specifications and verification, networks and distribution systems and risk analysis.

ENRE 799 – Master’s Thesis Research (1 - 6 credits)

ENRE 898 – Pre-Candidacy Research (1 - 8 credits)

ENRE 899 (Permission Required) – Doctoral Dissertation Research (6 credits)

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